Adelaide Hills Sauvignon Blanc

Adelaide Hills

Shaw + Smith

Established in 1989 by Martin Shaw and Michael Hill Smith, Shaw + Smith's...

aim is to make contemporary, high quality wines that stand among the best of their type in Australia. The wines are made exclusively from fruit grown in the Adelaide Hills, one of Australia's coolest and most exciting regions. Shaw + Smith specialise in grape varieties suited to cooler climates, such as Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, and also make fantastic wines from Shiraz and Pinot Noir.

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Vineyards

Grapes were sourced from the estate vineyards at Balhannah and Lenswood, complemented by fruit from a small number of highly valued growers.

Vintage Information

In 2017, there was record rainfall throughout the growing season but importantly it reduced to average in November during flowering and was dry during March, the later part of ripening. Record low temperatures were also recorded resulting in a late, very cool vintage. Flavours are intense and the natural acidity is striking.

Vinification

All the grapes were hand picked to ensure they were in pristine condition upon arrival at the winery. This ensured no oxidation or skin contact, resulting in less need for the use of SO2. Whole bunches were destemmed, crushed, chilled, gently pressed and then underwent cool fermentation in temperature controlled stainless steel vats. The wine was matured on the lees for a short period and was bottled early under screwcap to retain crispness.

Tasting Notes

The 2017 vintage is the 28th vintage of this wine, and is true to style with accentuated florals and very bright natural acidity. The pink grapefruit character, concentration and mid-palate texture reflect the carefully selected sites and hand harvesting during the small window of perfect ripeness.

Vintage Information

Vintage 2017
Grape varieties 100% Sauvignon Blanc
Region Adelaide Hills, South Australia
Winemaker Martin Shaw and Adam Wadewitz
Alcohol (ABV) 12%
Acidity 7.1g/l
Residual Sugar 2.8g/l
Wine pH 3.2